Jacob Rees-Mogg and May

Rees-mogg slams MPs who are trying to stop Brexit

The leading Brexiteer’s comments come as Theresa May prepares to publish her compromised amendments to her EU Withdrawal Bill after she dodged a Commons defeat this week.

It has been a chaotic week for Mrs May so far as she looks to make quick progress with Brexit negotiations, Number 10 is expected to publish its compromise plan for a “meaningful vote” on the final Brexit deal.

Led by Dominic Grieve, rebel MPs want Parliament to have the power to send Theresa May back to the negotiating table if they reject her Brexit deal.

Grieve

Dominic Grieve suggests his amendment had a bigger purpose

After an amendment was added in by the House of Lords, Theresa May was forced to offer concessions to rebel MPs at the eleventh hour to stop them voting down the EU Withdrawal Bill – which could block Brexit.

Mr Rees-Mogg warned when parliamentary scrutiny goes too far, it can be a “threat to Brexit”.

The meaningful vote was tabled by Lord Viscount Hailsham and was described as a “constitutional absurdity” by Professor Vernon Bogdanor of King’s College London.

Mr Rees-Mogg wrote in The Times: “What, then, is the purpose of the meaningful vote? It must be to send the Government back to Brussels with something that those who support it know, or at least are confident that, the European Union would accept.”

Mr Rees-Mogg claimed the group Best for Britain, led by Lord Malloch-Brown, just wants to stop Brexit and “its aim is not parliamentary sovereignty or oversight but continued vassalage with the European Union”.

The North East Somerset MP said: “The Commons already has the power to stop the executive.

House of Commons

MPs have been discussing the EU Withdrawal Bill

“Even the threat of a vote of confidence, assuming the chief whip can count — a skill at which the incumbent excels — would change government policy to ensure it remained in office.”

Mr Rees-Mogg said the leading Remain figures who have visited Brussels could be collecting intelligence on what Michel Barnier wants out of a deal.

He described Mr Grieve, who eventually did not vote for his proposal, as one of the most intelligent men in parliament and anything he asks for “will have a bigger purpose”.

He said: “Lord Hailsham, whose father and grandfather held the most distinguished office of lord chancellor, and Dominic Grieve are two of the cleverest men in parliament.

“They both have a deep attachment to the European Union and are expert draftsmen.

“That between them they have asked for a right that parliament already has ought to concern Brexiteers.

“It will not be accidental and will have a bigger purpose.”

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